Temple Mount Riots, the NGO Law, “United Against Jews”, Dire Water Shortage, Illegal EU Building, Watermelon Ingenuity


22 Sivan 5776

Tuesday, June 28 2016

 

UPDATES 7:00 am Israel Time

…The news you won’t read elsewhere: Palestinian terrorism yesterday…

*At 7:34 am, terrorists assaulted Israeli motorists on Route 443. Drivers and passengers were wounded; cars were smashed.

*At 9:48 pm, terrorists threw IEDs at Jewish worshipers at Rachel’s Tomb and at our troops stationed there. Most of the attacks took place in the upper parking lot. Why does the international media never report on Jewish worshipers being attacked at Jewish holy places?

By the way, most of the worshipers at Rachel’s Tomb are married orthodox women seeking a special blessing in order to get pregnant.

*More than 20 “rock” and Molotov attacks took place throughout the day.

*From morning until night, Palestinians rioted on the Temple Mount.

. . . Regarding those riots on the Temple Mount. . .

We still have about ten days of Ramadan to go, and all of the gestures of peace which Israel has given to the Muslims are having the predicted effect.

Not predicted by the idiotic Israeli government, but predicted right here on israelstreet.

Somehow, no one in charge seems to grasp the fact that the more you give to terrorists, the more they will attack you.

And so, the government’s busing in a million or so Muslim worshipers to the Temple Mount from Gaza, Judea, Samaria, and eastern Jerusalem now has the result of increasingly violent daily riots–all leading up in a crescendo to when Ramadan ends on July 7.

But wait . . .

It turns out that the terrorists are not to blame after all. Yesterday Jordanian government spokesman Mohammed al-Momeni condemned Israel for the riots.

Yes, you read that correctly.

Al-Momeni: “We demand that Israel immediately stop all the escalating actions which are totally unjustified and are in violation of all international treaties and conventions.”

Unbelievable and hypocritical coming from a government that refused last month to put video cameras on the Mount to stop all of the Palestinian violence.

. . . Finally, the NGO Transparency Bill gains momentum . . .

After being stalled in committee for months, the Constitution, Law and Justice Committee on Monday voted a somewhat watered down NGO Transparency Law out to the Knesset floor for its second and third “readings” (remember that each proposed law must be approved three times–the NGO bill passed its first reading months ago).

You will recall that the purpose of the proposed law is to force NGOs operating in Israel to reveal the sources of their funding from foreign sources if they get more than half of their funding from foreign entities. Those sources must be displayed on all literature and other media produced by the NGO.

There is still no word on when the second and third readings of this much-needed law will take place, but when it is approved, it will go into effect on January 1, 2017.

. . . However, it is already beginning to have an effect . . .

In a very interesting turn of events, traditionally leftist Ben Gurion University in Beersheva has decided not to give a financial award to the hideous group Breaking the Silence–a group funded primarily from international sources that pays disgruntled former IDF soldiers to travel the world trashing Israel.

How did Breaking the Silence’s friends react to the Ben Gurion decision?

Here’s what appeared on the Facebook page of the new Israel fund yesterday click here to read in Hebrew:

“It is unfortunate to discover that on the same day that the Law and Constitution committee approved a law persecuting and limiting leftist associations, Ben Gurion University has decided not to award a prize to the organization “Breaking the Silence.”

Dear friends, we have embarked on a public campaign to raise 20,000 shekels to prevent the silencing of Breaking the Silence. Please donate money to them, and forward it to them ASAP. You are welcome to join our efforts against the government’s attempts to keep their mouths shut.”

. . . Speaking of organizations whose sole purpose is to delegitimize Israel out of existence . . .

This BDS placard appeared in the The Netherlands a couple of days ago at a BDS conference.

Doesn't this say it all?

Doesn’t this say it all?

All of us have always known that BDS is violently anti-Semitic; in a perverse sort of way, it is refreshing to see it come out of its dark shadows and freely admit it.

. . . And while the European Union might be reeling from the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom . . .

It hasn’t slowed down for one second, its illegal onslaught in Area C of Israel–where it is attempting to facilitate a migration of Palestinians out of Areas A and B and into C. This picture of an EU funded road being built connecting the Palestinian settlements of Aqraba and Gittit in eastern Samaria was taken yesterday:

Note the EU-funded bulldozer encircled.

Note the EU-funded bulldozer encircled.

Why in the world is the Israeli government permitting this to happen?

. . . Speaking of Samaria and our fact of the day . . .

A few days ago, we discussed water use in Judea and Samaria. One facet of world condemnation has always been that Israel is stealing Palestinian water. In reality, the opposite is true.

Outright theft of water throughout the area as well as poorly maintained water piping in Areas A and B have combined to produce intense water shortages in the last few weeks within Jewish communities. Eastern Samaria in particular has been placed under emergency water rationing. Communities and cities such as Karnei Shomron, Kedumim, Ariel, and others are having to have water trucked in everyday.

The situation is expected to only get worse as the already blistering summer progresses.

By the way, there is no shortage of water anywhere else in Israel because of the massive desalination taking place.

. . . Speaking of the Israeli summer . . .

Two of the watermelon app's inventors.

Two of the watermelon app’s inventors.

What could be more Israeli than eating avatiach (watermelon)? It is virtually impossible to visit someone’s home these days without being offered slices of cool, delicious watermelon.

But the question has already been: how do you choose the right watermelon to buy? Personally, following in the footsteps of my grandfather who grew watermelons by the ton, your humble servant has always been a thumper. My technique is to thump watermelons until I find one that sounds hollow inside–and that is supposed to indicate that you will get a sweet one.

The only problem is that sometimes it does not.

Well guess what? Three enterprising Israeli students in Haifa’s Technion University computer science have applied good old Israeli ingenuity to solve the problem of watermelon choice.

What could be more Israeli than eating avatiach (watermelon)? It is virtually impossible to visit someone’s home these days without being offered slices of cool, delicious watermelon.

But the question has already been: how do you choose the right watermelon to buy? Personally, following in the footsteps of my grandfather who grew watermelons by the ton, your humble servant has always been a thumper. My technique is to thump watermelons until I find one that sounds hollow inside–and that is supposed to indicate that you will get a sweet one.

The only problem is that sometimes it is not.

Well guess what? Three enterprising Israeli students in Haifa’s Technion University computer science program applied good old Israeli ingenuity to solve the problem of watermelon choice.

They have created a telephone app.

It all started when Israeli-Arab student Salah Abed Alehlim (23) was sent out by his mother to buy a watermelon–who then proceeded to yell at him when he returned home with a clunker.

Enlisting the aid of his fellow students Adam Garah (22) and Ayman Sarha’an (23) as well as researchers from MIT and Oxford, Alehlim’s team identified six external factors including stripe patterns and the size of the circle on the bottom that can take the guesswork out of watermelon choosing.

So the next time you are thumping around at the watermelon stand, grocery store, or supermarket, you might think about getting the watermelon app. It might make your life a lot easier.

A final watermelon tip. Again following in the steps of my grandfather and my mother, you might try sprinkling some salt on your piece of watermelon. You might be surprised at how it enhances the taste!

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