One, Two, Three, BOOM! Life On The Gaza Wall in Netiv HaAsara


3 Kislev 5778

21 November 2017

 

The Excellent Quote of the Day

“It is impossible to define criticism from the Right as incitement and from the Left as freedom of expression.”

PM Netanyahu, speaking yesterday 

 

The News on the Israeli Street

Palestinian terror in the last 24 hours . . .

Soldiers, Border Police, Israeli civilians–all of these were targeted yesterday by “rock” and Molotov throwing terrorists.

The view from inside a bus that was attacked on Road 443 yesterday afternoon. The terrorists were attempting to cause the bus driver to lose control and crash. Fortunately, he did not.

The view from inside a bus that was attacked on Road 443 yesterday afternoon. The terrorists were attempting to cause the bus driver to lose control and crash. Fortunately, he did not.

These assaults took place at the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hevron, on the Gush Etzion road near Jerusalem, in Tekoa, at the Postal Junction, A-Ram, Hevron, Al-Arub, Beitin, Qalandiya, Beit Hanoun, Hizma, Nabi Saleh, and a host of other places.

The Israeli flag is a “provocation”. . .

In a startling display of political correctness, students at the Wingate Institute were ordered to take down an Israeli flag they had hung from the balcony of their dorm room.

The administrative officials blathered this: “The Institute is a welcoming place that invites all students to attend . . . The flag was a provocation . . . The decision is legitimate.”

So now, displaying an Israeli flag in the middle of Israel is a provocation?

We are starting down the slippery slope in Israel which will end with no displays of the Israeli flag, no singing of Hatikvah, and no celebrations of Israeli holidays because all of them are a “provocation.” 

The bizarre Breaking the Silence case becomes ever more bizarre . . .

Following the finding by the State Attorney that former IDF soldier and current Breaking the Silence spokesman Dean Issacharoff had lied about beating up a Palestinian when he (Issacharoff) was a soldier, and Issacharoff subsequently demanding to be indicted and tried for the nonexistent brutality, we had this sequence of events yesterday.

To begin with, Deputy Foreign Minister Tzipi Hotovely proclaimed this about Breaking the Silence on Channel 2:  “Every mother of a combat soldier should be ashamed of you. You are traitors.” In your humble servant’s opinion, Hotovely’s statement was exactly correct.

This was followed by Dean Issacharoff’s mother, Laura Kam, attacking Hotovely in a thinly veiled Facebook post:

“[I urge] Government and public officials to stop using incendiary and hateful language against any soldier who risked their lives to protect their country.”

Of course, Issacharoff’s mother is referring to the statement that her son and others in Breaking the Silence are traitors. However, the supreme irony of her statement is that using incendiary and hateful language against IDF soldiers is exactly how Breaking the Silence makes its living. 

In any case, the statement from Issacharoff’s mother was quickly followed by a similar one from his father, Jeremy Issacharoff–who happens to be the Israeli Ambassador to Germany. Of course his superior is Tzipi Hotovely.

Finally, Dean Issacharoff has once again declared that the State Attorney is nothing more than the spokesman for Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked and demanded that the State Attorney reopen the case against him.

Have you ever seen such a bizarre case of a person determined to prove himself guilty? Of course, in the absence of such a reopening, Breaking the Silence remains forever revealed for the abominable organization it is. 

TODAY’S BLOG:

One, Two, Three, BOOM! Life On The Gaza Wall in Netiv HaAsara 

Your humble servant spends much of his time in Israel traveling around the country. Following our trips to Judea and Samaria last month, we decided yesterday to head south to Nitzanim and Netiv HaAsara.

Whereas Nitzanim is a kibbutz, Netiv HaAsara is a moshav–both of them have the distinction of being two of the closest communities to the Gaza Border. In fact, Netiv HaAsara is not only close to the border, it is literally on the border. Today’s blog focuses on Netiv HaAsara.

At first, we were afraid that we would not be able to make the trip because, as we have reported previously on israelstreet, the entire Gaza Envelope (Otef Aza) is a closed military zone. Nevertheless, we were able to get through.

Take a look at the following map:

Note Gaza, the yellow strip in the lower left hand corner of the map.

Note Gaza, the yellow strip in the lower left hand corner of the map. The black spot to which the red arrow is pointing on the northern Gaza border is Netiv HaAsara.  If you look at the insert, the other red arrow is also pointing at Netiv HaAsara which is located in the red band. The white area to the south of the red band is Gaza and if you look closely you can see the street layout (in green) of Beit Hanoun.

Netiv HaAsara was originally located in the Sinai near Yamit. It was named for ten soldiers who died in a helicopter accident in Rafah in 1971. Unfortunately, when the Camp David Accords were signed, Yamit and Netiv HaAsara were both evacuated. Netiv HaAsara was relocated to its present location. It currently has a population of about 850 people.

These 850 people are literally living on the edge.

Of the wall.

Whereas most people have the general impression that a wall separates Gaza from Israel, the truth is that the only wall that separates Gaza from Israel is along its northern border where Netiv HaAsara is located. Here are a few pictures I took yesterday.

Picture 1:

This picture is looking down the wall toward the east.

This picture is looking down the wall toward the east.

Picture 2:

Look carefully. Note the sofa in the center of the picture and the edge of someone's house on the right edge of the photo. In the backround is the wall.

Look carefully. Note the sofa in the center of the picture and the edge of someone’s house on the right edge of the photo. In the background above the tree line is the wall.

Picture 3:

Look closely.

Look closely. Note the basketball goal to the right, a house being constructed to the left, and where does the street go? To the wall.

Picture 4:

The garden of the person's home that we visited. Note the missiles being used for flower pots.

The garden of the person’s home that we visited. Note the missiles being used for flower pots. Missiles are displayed in many yards in the community.

Sitting on the wall as they are, how much time do the residents of the community have between the time that they hear a warning siren of an incoming missile and when the missile hits?

As the lady of the household told us, it’s:

One, two, three, boom!

Anywhere from three to five seconds. In other words, you have three choices: you can do nothing and hope you don’t get killed; you can run like crazy to your fortified place; or you can fortify your whole house at tremendous expense. Most people combine choices two and three creating multiple fortified places and running like crazy.

Picture 5:

Another wide shot of the wall with your humble servant.

Another wide shot of the wall with your humble servant. We were waiting for the sirens to go off, but they didn’t.

Picture 6:

Residents of Netiv HaAsara, like all Israelis, earnestly seek peace--and the sign reads "The Path To Peace." It is unfortunate that the wall is all that keeps the peace.

Residents of Netiv HaAsara, like all Israelis, earnestly seek peace–and the sign reads “The Path To Peace.” It is unfortunate that the wall is all that keeps the peace.

Tomorrow, we will put up some more pictures of our day. Suffice it to say for now that we were incredibly impressed with the resilience of the people of Netiv HaAsara and their courage in maintaining their community in the face of constant danger.

 

 

This entry was posted in News and tagged A-Ram, Al-Arub, at the Postal Junction, Beit Hanoun, Beitin, border wall, Gaza, hevron, hizma, in Tekoa, nabi saleh, Netiv HaAsara, on the Gush Etzion road near Jerusalem, path to peace, pictures, qalandiya, the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hevron. Bookmark the permalink.

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